Yes, you were overanalyzing because you were asking questions

he did not want to answer and could not answer without bursting his bubble. Aha! Someone else out there is doing the math. Exactly! Then they’ll say how expensive the room is for the space. Call the hotel or wherever they rented the room and pretend like you want to host a gathering that’ll go on one evening and have the same sized crowd and they’ll give you a price. No, remember, that room is a commodity that expires quickly. If they don’t rent to someone that night, it’s lost income they can’t get back. If you’re willing to rent weekly on one night each week, they’ll cut you a good deal. The room I checked on was for a group that could be as much as 500 or more. It was something like $600 for the night and they easily raked in $1,200 or more with each meeting. If they had a weekly deal, they were probably getting $300 for a weekly fee for that space.

Not true at all. I know a millionaire who wears t-shirts and blue jeans most of the time. He’s usually wearing sandals or something that’s more like a cross between a shoe and a slipper and is often wearing ones that are just about worn out.

He’s just one example I’m thinking of. You can’t draw stereotypes about millionaires. A while back I was considering buying a new Mercedes convertible, before I decided I loved the antique one I had and the new one was just for ego. Actually, I was looking at a lot of convertibles and sports cars. The only sales staff that treated me with respect was the one at Mercedes. In short, if you’ve seen the “Cosby Show” episode about buying a car, he makes some good points. He intentionally dressed down for the experience. That’s what I always do. It gives me time to browse the lot without being disturbed by a fast talking “Harold Hill” type salesman. Interesting that the only high end dealer I stopped in to see was the only dealer that treated me well.

Perhaps they figure people who can afford an expensive car can also afford to live by their own rules.